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Schachter, Hendy & Johnson, Attorneys At Law

Group B Strep Infection: Could Your Baby’s Condition Have Been Prevented?

Group B streptococcus is not uncommon in adults and is typically considered harmless. However, for infants, this type of bacteria can be dangerous. Proper screening can help prevent serious illnesses caused by group B strep.

According to the American Pregnancy Association, “group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacterial infection that can be found in a pregnant woman’s vagina or rectum. This bacteria is normally found in the vagina and/or rectum of about 25% of all healthy, adult women.” This infection can be passed from the mother to the infant during delivery, which makes catching group B strep and treating it properly crucial to the baby’s safety.

It has been estimated that group B strep impacts 1 in every 2,000 babies born in the United States.

Routine Screening is Important to Prevent Group B Strep

Routine screening for group B strep is generally conducted between the 35th and 37th week of pregnancy. The screening consists of a swab of both the vagina and rectum. It only takes about 24 to 48 hours to obtain the results.

Group B strep can be treated with antibiotics, which helps prevent serious illness in the baby. When a doctor fails to take the appropriate precautions to avoid group B strep infection, it could be considered malpractice. If group B strep infection is not diagnosed or is diagnosed as another condition, or if it is not treated properly, the doctor may be held liable for resulting damages.

Has Your Child Suffered From Group B Strep?

If your child has suffered from a group B strep infection and you are wondering who is responsible, contact an experienced Kentucky birth injury attorney at the Law Office of Schachter, Hendy & Johnson at (859) 578-4444 or (888) 606-5297.  We have been representing families of injured children in Kentucky and Ohio for over 35 years.

You owe it to your child to get to the bottom of what caused his or her illness. Get answers to your questions by calling our office today.

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